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Misunderstanding Of Chicken Farming In The Countryside! Attention! ! !

Misunderstanding of chicken farming in the countryside! Attention! ! !

Many areas in rural areas now have large-scale chicken farming. We know that the natural environment in rural areas is superior. All kinds of farming are almost native and the farming is very simple. However, many farmers now have questions about chickens raised in rural areas in the past. They can live well without feeding medicines. Instead, chicken farming technology has improved. Why do we need many medicines to prevent disease? Let’s talk about the misunderstandings of chicken farming in rural areas:

Fewer mistakes in chicken farming in rural areas:

Regarding the problem of less chicken disease, it is actually a misunderstanding. Our impression of rural chickens generally stays in a grown-up group of chickens running in the yard, so many people think that rural chickens can be fed without medicine. Live well. The medicine may not be fed, but it is not always possible to live well. According to the editor, the average loss rate of chickens raised in rural areas for their own consumption is generally more than 50% from young chickens to adult chickens. That is to say, when buying chickens, there are 40 chickens, and it is possible that less than 20 chickens are really raised.

Why do large-scale chickens need medicine to prevent chicken diseases?

1. Large-scale chicken raising costs

Of course, this data is not **, like some local chicken breeds will have stronger disease resistance, and the mortality rate may not be so high. But the purpose of raising chickens is different, and the choices made by chicken farmers are naturally different. Chickens raised in rural areas are not made for money, not related to family income, and do not feed medicine. If you die, you will die, you won’t feel distressed, sometimes you just want to feed. Medicine may also feel uneconomical or do not know how to feed. However, once the chickens in the chicken farm are collectively ill, the mortality rate is high, and the chicken farmers may have to go out of business. Who dares to take this risk without medicine to prevent it? If the mortality rate is more than 50% as mentioned in the previous paragraph, then the chicken farmer would have to pay a misfortune.

2. Poor environment in large-scale chicken coop

One more important point is the problem of the chicken raising model. Today’s large-scale chicken farming, chickens in the chicken coop have a very harsh living environment, small range of activities, fast growth, and overcrowding, all of which provide good opportunities and channels for the outbreak and spread of the outbreak. Chicken farmers must use various drugs for prevention and treatment, so that the chickens can grow healthily and create economic value for themselves steadily. However, the dozens or dozens of chickens raised in rural areas have a free and comfortable living environment, strong resistance, and there are basically no channels for the spread of epidemics, so naturally they are healthier.

Therefore, the truth is that chickens raised in rural areas do not live well without medicine. In fact, they have a high mortality rate. Even if there is no drug feeding and the mortality rate is low, this is also determined by the goals of the chicken and the model of the chicken, and the current large-scale chicken model is necessary. After all, the breeds and feeding methods of free-range chickens are slow and costly. If they are all raised in this way, ordinary people may not be able to eat chickens and eggs.

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